ON BOARD NASA's New Horizons took images
of landscapes never seen before.
Click Here new horizons satellite this is the optimax white logo I love Pluto icon New Horizons
MARS ROVER 2020 Optics imaging the surface of Mars, as part
of NASA’s long-term robotic exploration
of the red planet.
IN SPACE Click Here Mars space rover this is the optimax white logo rock from space

Optimax

in Space

Optimax is proud to have participated in many NASA programs. We have supplied NASA with high-quality imaging lenses designed for position sensing, mapping landforms, and optical analysis.

MARS ROVER 2020 - Perseverance

MARS ROVER 2020 - Perseverance

Launched: 2020

Mission: The Mars 2020 mission is part of NASA’s Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the Red Planet. This mission addresses questions about the potential for life on Mars and takes the next step by not only seeking signs of habitable conditions on Mars in the ancient past but also searching for signs of past microbial life itself.

Optimax on Board: NavCam, HazCam, CacheCam, Mastcam, Sherloc

Perseverance Is on Its Way to Mars
Find the Countdown to Landing, Mission Phase, and more about the Rover’s Mission by clicking here

Full Gallery of Image Resources: Mars Perseverance Rover Images

Video Resources: Mars Perseverance Rover Videos

Videos and Images Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

MERCURY MESSENGER

MERCURY MESSENGER

Launched: 2004

Mission: To study Mercury’s chemical composition, geology and magnetic field.

Messengers power comes mainly from its solar array. Power produced by the solar array is stored in a battery and then distributed to the other systems.

This satellite provided evidence that Mercury’s polar craters contain water ice.

Check out the entire mission details on the NASA website: NASA’s Mercury Messenger Mission

Find out Details: Messenger: The Extreme Mission

Full Gallery of Image Resources: Mercury Messanger Mission Images

Video Resources: Mercury Messanger Mission Videos

Videos and Images Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION

International Space Station

Launched: 1988

Mission: To enable long-term exploration of space and provide benefits to people on Earth. As the third brightest object in the sky the space station is easy to see if you know when to look up.

The space station, including its large solar arrays, spans the area of a U.S. football field, including the end zones, and weighs 924,739 pounds.

Check out the entire mission details on the NASA website: International Space Station mission

Find out Details: International Space Station Mission

Full Gallery of Image Resources: International Space Station Mission Images

Video Resources: International Space Station Mission Videos

Videos and Images Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

GLOBAL WARMING OCO

Global Warming OCO

Launched: 2009

Mission: Helps researchers watch the earth breathe and maps CO2 from space to help understand how humanity’s contribution of the greenhouse gas is affecting global climate change.

A faulty rocket brought the observatory plunging to the earth right after its launch in 2009.

Check out more on climate change and current and future NASA missions:
NASA’s Study of Global Climate Change

Videos and Images Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

Launched: 2009

Mission: A robotic mission that set out to map the moon’s surface and, after a year of exploration, was extended with a unique set of science objectives.
Images from LRO created a new picture of the moon as a dynamic and complex body.

Provided insight into how radiation can change the chemistry of water ice throughout the solar system.

Check out the entire mission details on the NASA website: Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission

Find out Details: Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission

Full Gallery of Image Resources: Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission Images

Videos and Images Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Mars Rovers Spirit & Opportunity

Mars Rovers Spirit & Opportunity

Launched: 2003

Mission: The Mars Exploration Rovers act as robot geologists while they are on the surface of Mars.

In some senses, the rovers´ parts are similar to what any living creature would need to keep it “alive” and able to explore.

Mars in a Minute. Watch how to get to the red planet.

Check out the entire mission details on the NASA website: Mars Rovers Spirit & Opportunity Mission

Full Gallery of Image Resources: Mars Rovers Spirit & Opportunity Mission Images

Video Resources: Mars Rovers Spirit & Opportunity Mission Videos

Videos and Images Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

MARS ROVER CURIOSITY

Mars Rover Curiosity

Launched: 2011

Mission: The Mars Science Laboratory landed in Gale Crater on August 5, 2012, at 10:31 p.m. PDT

Optimax optics made it possible for the Mars Rover to take its first images of Mars.

For more information about the landing of Curiosity check out NASA MSL’s, “7 Minutes of Terror”, which shows how Optimax lenses made this landing possible.

Check out the entire mission details on the NASA website: NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover

Full Gallery of Image Resources: Mars Curiosity Rover Images

Video Resources: Mars Curiosity Rover Videos

Videos and Images Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Pluto New Horizons

Pluto “New Horizons”: Voyage to Unexplored Planet

Launched: 2006

Mission: The New Horizons mission will help us understand worlds at the edge of our solar system by making the first reconnaissance of the dwarf planet Pluto and by venturing deeper into the distant, mysterious Kuiper Belt – a relic of solar system formation.

New Horizons launched on Jan. 19, 2006; it swung past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February 2007 and will conduct a five-month-long reconnaissance flyby study of Pluto and its moons in summer 2015. Pluto’s closest approach is scheduled for July 14, 2015. As part of an extended mission, the spacecraft is expected to head farther into the Kuiper Belt to examine one or two of the ancient, icy mini-worlds in that vast region, at least a billion miles beyond Neptune’s orbit.

Sending a spacecraft on this long journey will help us answer basic questions about the surface properties, geology, interior makeup and atmospheres on these bodies.

Optimax on Board: Optimax lenses are on-board the LORRI (Long Range Reconnaissance Imager) telescopic camera which will obtain data at long distances and map Pluto’s far side and provide high-resolution geologic data.

Check out the entire mission details on the NASA website: Jupiter Fly-By- New Horizon Mission

Videos and Images Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Jupiter Fly By - New Horizon

Jupiter Fly By - New Horizon

Launched: 2007

Mission: New Horizons is en route to Pluto, and made its closest approach to Jupiter on February 28, 2007, giving more insight into the planet.

The ultraviolet images show aurora emissions that are always present in the polar regions of Jupiter. They are typically 10-100 times brighter than the northern lights seen on the Earth.

Through combined remote imaging by Hubble and in situ measurements by New Horizons, the two missions will enhance each other scientifically, allowing scientists to learn more about Jupiter’s atmosphere.

Check out the entire mission details on the NASA website: NASA’s Pluto New Horizons Mission

New Horizons: The First Mission to the Pluto System and the Kuiper Belt: Read the Complete Story

Full Gallery of Image Resources: Pluto New Horizons Mission Images

Video Resources: Pluto New Horizons Mission Videos

Videos and Images Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Other Missions

Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)

Mission: The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is the next step in the search for planets outside of our solar system, including those that could support life. The mission will find exoplanets that periodically block part of the light from their host stars, events called transits. TESS will survey 200,000 of the brightest stars near the sun to search for transiting exoplanets.

Launched: TESS launched on April 18, 2018, aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

Optimax on Board: Telescope Optics

Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)

Mission:

JPSS is the Nation’s new generation polar-orbiting operational environmental satellite system. As the backbone of the global observing system, JPSS polar satellites circle the Earth from pole-to-pole and cross the equator about 14 times daily in the afternoon orbit, providing full global coverage twice a day. JPSS delivers key observations for forecasting severe weather like hurricanes, tornadoes, and blizzards days in advance, and assessing environmental hazards such as droughts, forest fires, poor air quality, and harmful coastal waters.

SPIRou

Mission: SPIRou’s mission is to search for exoplanets around low-mass stars and T Tauri stars, as well as study these star’s magnetic fields. The SPIRou science team will explore the diversity of exoplanet systems of M stars, identify habitable telluric planets for future space-based atmospheric studies.

×
X